Guide to art: Link light rail

Dan Corson, Space Forms, 2009, all rights reserved
Space Forms by Dan Corson, on display at the Beacon Hill station.

Creating a sense of place

Sound Transit's art collection creates welcoming and engaging environments at stations and transit facilities throughout Central Puget Sound. Artists with a diverse range of style, scale and perspective create positive experiences for riders and visitors.

Enjoy these artworks as points of interest along your Link light rail journey. Learn more at soundtransit.org/STart.

All works and images contained on this webpage are protected by the artists' copyright; all rights reserved.

Featured artwork: © Dan Corson, Space Forms, 2016, all rights reserved

University of Washington

Graduation cap pictogram for the UW station.

3796 Montlake Boulevard East, Seattle

 
Image of Subterranium, 2015 Leo Saul Berk, UW Station between mezzanines.

Subterranium by Leo Saul Berk – located between the mezzanines

By cutting geology inspired hatch-patterns into the walls and ceiling of the 110-foot deep station, Berk created the experience of an underground planetarium.

Capitol Hill Station

Flag pictogram for the Capitol Hill station.

100 Broadway East, Seattle

 
Jet Kiss by Mike Ross, on display at the Capitol Hill station.

Jet Kiss by Mike Ross – located on the platform

Ross transformed two retired Navy jets into organic forms that almost meet for a kiss above the station platform.

Crossed Pinkies by Ellen Forney, on display at the Capitol Hill station. Walking Fingers by Ellen Forney, on display at the Capitol Hill station.

Crossed Pinkies and Walking Fingers by Ellen Forney – located at the north and west entrances

The station's large entry murals are an outgrowth from a series of Forney's paintings that feature hands in a variety of gestures, using forms that are spare yet graphically powerful.

Downtown Seattle Transit Tunnel

Crown pictogram for the Westlake station.
Theater glasses pictogram for the University Street station.
Boat with sails pictogram for the Pioneer Square station.
Dragon pictogram for the International District/Chinatown station.
Torch pictogram for the Stadium station.
 

DSTT

Downtown Seattle Transit Tunnel, Seattle

The DSTT was built in 1989 by King County Metro for easy bus access to Seattle's downtown core, and for the region's future light rail system. Each station's unique look results from 25 artists collaborating with the design and construction teams.

More than 30 artworks are installed in and around the tunnel stations.

Operations and Maintenance Facility

Airport Way and Forest Street, Seattle

R-ail by Western Neon, on display at the Operations and Maintenance Facility.

R-ail by Western Neon - located on the building facade

The iconic "R" from the Rainier Brewery plant that once stood at Forest Street and Airport Way was salvaged and now finds new life on the light rail maintenance facility building. (Rainier R used with permission.)

Safety Spires by Dan Corson and Norie Sato, on display at the Operations and Maintenance Facility.

Safety Spires, by Dan Corson and Norie Sato - located at the train yard

Taking advantage of the need for over 100 power poles at the maintenance facility, the artists brought this system element to the forefront through color and sculptural attachments, transforming the poles into a collection of horsetail reeds.

Eat, Drink and Be Merry by Ries Niemi, on display at the Operations and Maintenance Facility.

Eat, Drink and Be Merry by Ries Niemi – located at Forest Street and Airport Way

A trio of tensile steel sculptures was inspired by shopping, dining and entertainment in the downtown retail core. Because of University Link construction, the artwork was relocated to the Link Operations and Maintenance Facility in SoDo.

SODO Station

Anvil pictogram for the SODO station.

Lander Street and Busway, Seattle

 
Made in the USA by Michael Davis, on display at the SODO station.

Made in USA by Michael Davis – located in the plaza

The station's industrial surroundings are reflected in a gateway comprised of an L-square and carpenter's pencil accompanied by custom I-beam benches.

Beacon Hill Station

Kite pictogram for the Beacon Hill station.

at Beacon Avenue and Lander Street, Seattle

 
What the Naked Molerat Saw by Bill Bell, on display at the Beacon Hill station.

What the Naked Molerat Saw by Bill Bell – visible approaching tunnel platform

Riders approaching the Beacon Hill platform can see a flash of playing cards through the train windows and decide whether they have a good hand that day. Random images change throughout the day.

Space Forms by Dan Corson, on display at the Beacon Hill station.

Space Forms by Dan Corson – located on the platforms

Brightly colored translucent sculptures suspended over the waiting area ask the questions: Are these forms giant floating creatures in space? Microscopic creatures floating under a microscope?

Portals by Dan Carson, on display at the Beacon Hill station.

Portals by Dan Corson – located on the platform concourse

The questioning of scale and origin continues in a wall of portals with images from the Hubble telescope, a microscope and the deep sea.

Common Threads-Community Patterns by Carl Smool, on display at the Beacon Hill station.

Common Threads-Community Patterns by Carl Smool – located on the plaza

Textile patterns from the cultures and heritage of Beacon Hill residents appear in etched "carpets" in the plaza's granite walkway, announcing the station entrance. An Aztec-patterned vent screen on the north wall is dedicated to El Centro de La Raza, which provided its title: The Mexica Journey… A Beacon: Unidad, Resistencia and Hope.

Mount Baker Station

Mountains pictogram for the Mount Baker station.

Rainier Avenue and McClellan Street, Seattle

 
Rain, Steam and Speed by Guy Kemper, on display at the Mount Baker station.
Seattle Sunshine by Guy Kemper, on display at the Mount Baker station.

Rain, Steam and Speed and Seattle Sunrise by Guy Kemper – located on the platform level

Vibrant blown glass colors are a counterpoint to Seattle's grey and blue skies for both train riders and the surrounding Mount Baker neighborhood.

Sky Within by Sheila Klein, on display at the Mount Baker station.

Sky Within by Sheila Klein – located on the plaza level

The underbelly of the train guideway becomes a 400-foot-long community plaza with six chandeliers made of repurposed cobra-head street lights. The lights subtly shift colors throughout the evening onto a ceiling painted in urban camouflage.

How the Crow Created the World with Lightning by Barbara Earl Thomas, on display at the Mount Baker station.

How the Crow Created the World with Lightning by Barbara Earl Thomas – located at MLK and Walden Street

Considering a neighborhood filled with churches, the constant presence of crows and the electrical station that her artwork would shield, the artist conceived a narrative in which crows harnessed lighting into their beaks, from which flowed a landscape of mountains, trees and water.

Cultural Storyboards by Peter Reiquam Lead Artist, on display at the Mount Baker station.

Cultural Storyboards by Peter Reiquam, Lead Artist – located on MLK between Henderson and Walden Streets

Lead artist Peter Reiquam worked with five artists from diverse backgrounds to translate their drawings addressing culture, community, change and journey into laser-cut metal banners. (Contributing artists: Joe Feddersen, James Jaxxa, Chris Silva, Dionne Haroutunian, Sultan Mohammed)

Columbia City Station

Flying pigeon pictogram for the Columbia City station.

MLK and Edmunds Street, Seattle

 
Garden Windows by Juan Alonso, on display at the Columbia City station.

Garden Windows by Juan Alonso – located on the SE Plaza, Edmunds Street

Organic, plant-like forms illustrate the nature of all things to reach out. A human circulatory system, a freeway system, rivers and roots, all start with a central spine that branches out in different directions. The windows subtly invite riders to "branch out" and explore.

Pride by Norie Sato, on display at the Columbia City station.

Pride by Norie Sato – located on the NW Plaza, Alaska Street

Stone, brick and bronze lions from many cultures guard the entrance of the station's south plaza, ensuring a safe, welcoming journey for patrons. Included is a hand-carved brick lion made in collaboration with master brick carver Mara Smith.

Global Garden Shovel by Victoria Fuller, on display at the Columbia City station.

Global Garden Shovel by Victoria Fuller – located at the NW Plaza, Alaska Street

Gardening and cultivation are universal. Plants, fruits and vegetables from around-the-world intertwine to form a 36-foot-tall bronze shovel digging into the landscape, symbolizing new beginnings and new possibilities.

A Relic in the Garden by Gale McCall, on display at the Columbia City station.

A Relic in the Garden by Gale McCall – located on the platform

Through bronze magnifying glasses and baskets, station visitors are invited to explore a neighborhood of converging cultures and to gather ideas and information about the world.

Sound of Light by Richard C. Elliott, on display at the Columbia City station.

Sound of Light by Richard C. Elliott – located at MLK and Hudson Street

Using sequential panels of primary colors and reflective geometric patterns, the artist created a composition that makes up an ever-changing visual symphony.

Othello Station

Deer pictogram for the Othello station.

MLK and Othello Street, Seattle

 
Rainier Valley Haiku by Roger Shimomura, on display at the Othello station.

Rainier Valley Haiku by Roger Shimomura – located on the NE Plaza, Myrtle Street

Is our culture becoming a melting pot or a tossed salad? Is one condition preferable to the other? The artist asks these questions in a 13-foot-tall sculpture of stacked objects that stimulates public interpretations about immigrant culture in America.

Stormwater Project by Brian Goldbloom, on display at the Othello station.

Stormwater Project by Brian Goldbloom – located on the platform

Inspired by stonework included in Japan's Osaka Castle, eight artist-designed granite stormwater catch basins are integrated both physically and visually into the station. Each piece includes a unique design of water channels interlaced with everyday objects.

Come Dance With Me by Augusta Asberry, on display at the Othello station.

Come Dance With Me by Augusta Asberry – located on the SE Plaza, Othello Street

These lyrical and flowing figures grew out of the artist's passion for dress designing coupled with an interest in African art. Viewers are invited to feel the movement of the dancers and listen for the silent beat guiding the flow of their motion. Artist Keith Haynes completed the painting portion after Asberry's death.

Reeds and Bangles by Norie Sato and Dan Corson, on display at the Othello station.

Reeds and Bangles by Norie Sato and Dan Corson – located on MLK between Henderson and Walden Streets

The tops of the Overhead Contact System poles along the MLK Corridor resemble reeds bending in an eastern breeze. Poles on either side of each station are wrapped with metal "bangles," visually indicating the approaching station.

Rainier Beach Station

Seagull pictogram for the Rainier Beach station.

MLK and Henderson Street, Seattle

 
Parable by Buster Simpson, on display at the Rainier Beach station.

Parable by Buster Simpson – located on the NE Plaza, Henderson Street

Set in the orchard-like plaza landscaping, the still-life sculpture resembles a bowl of pears and wrecking balls, morphed into one. Parable provides an allegorical reference to the ordered urban landscape and the dynamically changing city.

Dragonfly by Darlene Nguyen-Ely, on display at the Rainier Beach station.

Dragonfly by Darlene Nguyen–Ely – located on the north platform

Nguyen-Ely drew inspiration from the station's architectural elements to create a figure caught in flight. The large, winged sculpture conjures flight imagery, wind, architecture and the artist's own immigrant experiences.

Increment by Eugene Parnell, on display at the Rainier Beach station.

Increment by Eugene Parnell – located on the platform

Four bronze columns line the station platform. Their feature reliefs depict height comparisons and measuring systems from around the world. The sculptures invite the public to interact, see how they "measure up" and to consider the use of information to quantify and explain the natural world around us.

Pinwheel mosaic by Mauricio Robalino, on display at the Rainier Beach station.

Flores, Fishmobile Crossing, Pinwheel mosaic and gate by Mauricio Robalino – located on the south platform, power station

Large glass mosaics inspired by the artist's Ecuadoran textile background adorn the substation and service building, which evolve to a metal pattern on an adjacent gate.

Blue Lights Over Duwamish by Norie Sato and Dan Corson, on display at the Rainier Beach station.

Blue Lights Over Duwamish by Norie Sato and Dan Corson – located at Duwamish River and East Marginal Way, Tukwila

Trains crossing the Duwamish River trigger a glowing blue line of lights on the bridge, creating a light show that plays off the bridge and the water below.

Tukwila/International Blvd Station

Boat and paddle pictogram for the Tukwila International Boulevard station.

International Blvd and S 154th Street, Tukwila

 
A Molecule of the Region by Tad Savinar, on display at the Tukwila International Boulevard station.A Drop of Sustenance by Tad Savinar, on display at the Tukwila International Boulevard station.

A Molecule of the Region, A Drop of Sustenance and Voices of Tukwila by Tad Savinar – located on the platform, suspended over the Mezzanine

The artist worked with the community to reveal the city's identity and connect transit users to Tukwila using sculpture and integrated artwork. The voices of the community are spread throughout the station via granite pavers. Two suspended sculptures illustrate the core of Tukwila and living water, the element that provides sustenance for all creatures that pass through the region.

Soundings by Clark Wiegman, on display at the Tukwila International Boulevard station.

Soundings by Clark Wiegman – located in the plaza

An abstracted hazelnut was inspired by the Duwamish name for Tukwila, k'ap'uxac, which means "place of hazelnuts." A blue ribbon of light along the neck of the sculpture traces the pattern of the Duwamish River as it passes through the City of Tukwila.

Shimmering Shadowlines by Norie Sato and Dan Corson, on display at the Tukwila International Boulevard station.

Shimmering Shadowlines by Norie Sato and Dan Corson – located on Hwy 518 between I-5 and Hwy 99, Tukwila

Recalling the well-known Sparkletts water delivery trucks, strips of mylar disks create shimmering panels that call attention to and celebrate the architecturally refined guideway columns while reducing their visual mass.

SeaTac/Airport Station

Flying carpet pictogram for the SeaTac station.

International Blvd and S 176th Street, SeaTac

 
Flying Sails by Werner Klotz, on display at the SeaTac Airport station.

Flying Sails by Werner Klotz – located on the platform and mezzanine

A pair of 35-foot-high stainless steel abstract sails hang from the platform ceiling to the mezzanine level between the escalators. Wind-activated panels on the northern sail contain the names of Northwest native tribes; the southern sail names cities on the same latitude or longitude as Seattle.

Restless by Christian Moeller, on display at the SeaTac Airport station.

Restless by Christian Moeller – located on the International Blvd pedestrian bridge

A series of red propellers rotate horizontally in the ceiling of the pedestrian bridge creating an abstract sculpture to keep birds – both revered and reviled by the flight-centric Airport – at bay.

Celestial Navigation by Fernanda D'Agostina, on display at the SeaTac Airport station.

Celestial Navigation by Fernanda D'Agostino – located on the plaza

An 18-foot-high glass and metal sculpture, inspired by a navigational quadrant, serves as a projection screen for an artist-created video about the cultures residing in the SeaTac area and studies of flight. The plaza is enhanced with terrazzo and bronze inlay circles.

The Braid by Norie Sato, on display at the SeaTac Airport station.

The Braid by Norie Sato – located on all Link light rail station platforms; from UW in Seattle to Angle Lake in SeaTac

Sato created The Braid design for the initial Link line in Seattle. Now each light rail station incorporates this tactile paving pattern in the form of a rope, stretching along the length of the platform. Braided knots indicate vehicle boarding areas and a braided sculpture marks the station entrance. Together, these wayfinding elements tie the stations together.

Angle Lake Station

Fish pictogram for the Angle Lake station.

19863 28th Ave S, SeaTac

 
Cloud by Laura Haddad, on display at the Angle Lake station.

Cloud by Laura Haddad – located on the platform

Wind activates thousands of individual discs while sunlight makes them shimmer and glow. The Cloud serves as a sculptural barometer of local weather.

Immerse by Jill Anholt, on display at the Angle Lake station.

Immerse by Jill Anholt – located on the plaza

Immerse appears to hang weightlessly in the portal of the plaza's grand staircase, with the sculpture's four delicate arcs transferring light into the parking area below.