Looking up at a yellow sculpture that resembles the building block toys for kids.
Media Caption
“Building Blocks” by R&R Studios is outside Roosevelt Station.

Art brings new stations to life

Publish Date

Three new light rail stations in the U District, Roosevelt and Northgate neighborhoods open in less than two months! 

We're excited to welcome everyone to the new facilities on Oct. 2, but in the meantime, we're giving you a sneak peek of what makes them come alive: the amazing public art. 

The art pieces were inspired by the local communities these stations will serve - from cyclists in Roosevelt to the natural environment around Northgate. 

Take a closer look at each piece with the video and photos below!

 

Northgate Station:

Mary Ann Peters was inspired by the nature and sounds of the Northgate area. With an homage to the Washington State Insect, the Green Darner dragonfly, she created a painting in glass for the west clerestory of the platform.  

Green and yellow stained glass art is seen from the platform at Northgate Station.
Peters' main piece covers over 100 feet of the upper west windows on the passenger platform.
A stained glass dragonfly is etched into the windows at Northgate Station.
A second, smaller artwork is in the stairwell glass facing Northeast 103rd Street.

Cris Bruch’s plaza sculpture serves as a landmark and meeting place for train riders and neighbors from the nearby urban village. A large, gracefully arching, painted-steel structure, the sculpture emulates natural forms and public utility structures.

A tall sculpture that looks like a flower is seen next to the elevated tracks near Northgate Station.
Aluminum baskets hang from the ends of the branches, collected into bunches the artist calls "blossoms."

Bruch describes his other sculpture, located on 1st Avenue Northeast near the north entrance, as a large, "low-dimension cluster of polyhedrons."

A metal sculpture made up of various shapes sits on a wall near Northgate Station.
This piece is mounted on the station’s greenery screen wall.  

Roosevelt Station:

R & R Studios, the team of Roberto Behar and Rosario Marquardt, created a landmark for the neighborhood on the plaza at 12th Ave NE and NE 66th Street. Their sculpture “Building Blocks” is a 49-foot-tall, 21-foot-wide, and 2-1/2 -foot deep stepped pyramid painted in bold tones of gold, yellow, green, blue and red.

 

A large yellow sculpture outside Roosevelt Station resembles building blocks.
In Roosevelt, neighbors requested a space where people can meet, chat and mingle.

 

Luca Buvoli has created a pathway using bold, graphic artwork suggesting runners and cyclists in motion, to help guide passengers from the station’s exterior to the underground platform.

An art piece depicting cyclists is seen on the wall at the Roosevelt Station platform.
Buvoli’s artwork is inspired by film and artwork of the Italian Futurism movement.
An art piece depicting cyclists is seen on the wall at the Roosevelt Station platform.
These pieces are a continuation of Buvoli's larger body of work about people and objects in motion.

U District Station:

Lead Pencil Studio’s sculptures evoke the architectural ornament once seen on historic buildings.

Art on the wall at U District Station looks like the windows of apartment buildings.
Made from hammered aluminum, the sculptures, visible from the mezzanine and the platform, represent architectural fragments (window frames, rooflines, and fire escapes) developed from the artists’ collection of 3D scans made in cities around the world.
Art on the wall at U District Station looks like the windows of apartment buildings.
The window-like objects contain video screens with a slowly changing collection of ethereal films that, according to the artists, depict “ordinary apartment life, historical events from the University District, the natural environment, UW student life and the Alaska Yukon Pacific Exposition.”  

Visit our website for more details on Sound Transit's art program, STart.

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